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The Next Web

How studying our reaction to coronavirus can help us fight climate change


Climate change and COVID-19 are the two most significant crises faced by the modern world – and widespread behavior change is essential to cope with both. This means that official messaging by the government and other authorities is critical. To succeed, leaders need to communicate the severe threat effectively and elicit high levels of public compliance, without causing undue panic.

But the extent to which people comply depends on their psychological filters when receiving the messages – as the coronavirus pandemic has shown. Read More

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The Verge

Voters want Facebook to be accountable for climate misinformation, poll finds


A majority of polled voters, 64 percent, think Facebook should be held accountable for failing to warn users about opinion articles that spread misinformation about climate change, according to a survey by the think tank Data for Progress. Fifty-nine percent of respondents believe social media companies, including Facebook and Twitter, ought to label opinion articles containing false information about science and climate change.

The poll, which included a group of 1,318 people representative of the voting population in the US, was first published by journalist Emily Atkin. Atkin published the results this morning on her newsletter, Heated, after readers submitted questions for the poll. Read More

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The Next Web

Scientists are homing in on understanding just how sensitive our climate is to CO2


At the dawn of the industrial revolution, the Earth’s atmosphere contained 278 parts of CO₂ per million. Today, after more than two and a half centuries of fossil fuel use, that figure is around 414 parts per million (ppm). If the build-up of CO₂ continues at current rates, by 2060 it will have passed 560 ppm – more than double the level of pre-industrial times.

Exactly how the climate will respond to all this extra CO₂ is one of the central questions in climate science. Just how much will the climate actually change? Read More

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Mashable

How a decrease in transportation emissions can impact climate change


Transportation is the top source of CO2 emissions worldwide. Our reliance on travel using energy via fossil fuel creates a carbon footprint that’s far too big. Here’s how we can shrink its size for the longterm security of our planet. Read more…

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Wired

Apple Sets Climate Goals for 2030, Joining Amazon and Microsoft


The fact that we’re in the middle of a pandemic makes it easy to forget about that other massive global emergency hanging over our heads: the climate crisis. And yet, scientists, scholars, and other Big Thinkers are quick to point out that the pandemic and the climate crisis—along with severe social inequalities—are intimately linked.

Big Tech companies are also fully aware of this, as the hastening growth of the technology sector has exposed its massive carbon footprint, resource-hungry data centers, and not-very-repairable products. In an attempt to counteract some of this impact, Apple announced today that it’s upping its climate pledge. The company revealed a massive plan to become carbon-neutral across its entire business, including manufacturing, by 2030. It also announced a new recycling robot, one that will extract rare-earth metals from one of the most fragile systems in the iPhone. Read More

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Mashable

Greta Thunberg launches open letter demanding world leaders take immediate action on climate crisis

Greta Thunberg has launched an open letter signed by thousands of activists and celebrities, and hundreds of scientists demanding global leaders take measurable, immediate action to genuinely tackle the climate crisis.

“The race to safeguard future living conditions for life on Earth as we know it needs to start today,” reads the letter, sent to all EU leaders and heads of state on Thursday. “Not in a few years, but now.” Signatories include Malala Yousafzai, Leonardo DiCaprio, Priyanka Chopra, Opal Tometi, Jane Fonda, Shawn Mendes, Coldplay, Mark Ruffalo, Margaret Atwood, and many others. Read More

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The Verge

New Joe Biden plan sees millions of jobs in aggressive climate action


On Wednesday, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden revealed a revamped climate and energy plan that raises spending, expands efforts to address racial disparities, and sets an earlier deadline for cutting greenhouse gases.

Biden’s plan aims to eliminate carbon pollution from the power sector by 2035. Biden had previously committed to reaching a 100 percent “clean energy economy” by 2050. The plan comes with a $2 trillion price tag over four years, higher than his previous ten-year $1.7 trillion plan. Forty percent of clean energy investments will be earmarked for “disadvantaged communities.” Read More

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Mashable

5 ways to cope with climate change anxiety


Moving forward requires focus. Mashable’s Social Good Series is dedicated to exploring pathways to a greater good, spotlighting issues that are essential to making the world a better place.

Melting ice sheets. Wildfires that turn the sky red. Record-breaking heat waves.

The terrifying effects of climate change are hard to miss. They also leave many people fearful about the future of the planet and our civilization.

If that sounds familiar, you’re not alone. A recent survey, conducted in December by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association, found that more than two-thirds of respondents experience at least a little “eco-anxiety” and more than a quarter feel a lot of that stress. The APA defines eco-anxiety as anxiousness or concern related to climate change and its effects.  Read More

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VentureBeat

Privately funded climate tech isn’t enough to save us. Governments must step in.


Take the latest VB Survey to share how your company is implementing AI today.

When my son was four, he stated from his booster car seat that humans were going to kill themselves. Not something you typically expect to or want to hear from a toddler, but this little guy had been studying bugs, trees, and animals much more closely than your average toddler. Climate change had already inched its way into his brain, thanks to nature books and shows he had been exposed to in his four short years.

Fast forward to last week at bedtime, and my now 10-year-old son explained humans need to find another planet to live on soon or else we will all die, as our resources are slipping away too quickly. Or, he proposed, we can hope for more frequent pandemics and natural disasters to reduce our population. Read More

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Mashable

Alternative meat can help stop climate change. Here’s how.


Moving forward requires focus. Mashable’s Social Good Series is dedicated to exploring pathways to a greater good, spotlighting issues that are essential to making the world a better place.

We live in a rapidly-warming world that is saturated in meat. Even in the wake of a pandemic that shuttered processing plants, raised prices, and boosted sales of alternative meat, the $1.7 trillion global animal meat industry didn’t go anywhere. Beef is still a staple at supermarkets, restaurants and family tables across the U.S. (Pork remains the most popular meat in most of Europe and Asia).

That’s a shame because cutting down on meat consumption in general — and beef in particular — is one of the best things we can do as individuals for the environment. Livestock is the cause of one-fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to a landmark 2014 U.S. land use study. And not all livestock was created equal. Each cow needs 28 times more land and 11 times more water than the average agricultural animal; each cow leads to 5 times the emissions.   Read More