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Tech Radar

The best Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals and contracts

Apple’s latest release is finally here and when it comes to the search for where to buy the phone, many in the UK will start their search with Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals. As one of the best known retailers around, Carphone is a great place to look for both the iPhone 12 and 12 Pro with a host of deals already available in the device’s pre-order period. However, after the news that Carphone cut ties with EE, the retailer is slightly limited in what it can offer. While it still has access to Virgin, iD Mobile and Vodafone, EE, Three and O2 contracts won’t be available from Carphone. With that in mind, the best Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals seem to be on Vodafone with a host of big data plans and on iD Mobile where prices are a bit lower than other networks. Below you can find all of the best Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals so you can find the best contract for you. And if you can’t see any prices that fit what you need, consult our iPhone 12 deals guide instead. Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 vouchers: Compare Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals: What kind of iPhone 12 deals are other brands offering? Carphone Warehouse isn’t always the cheapest of retailers and with that in mind it is well worth seeing what prices other retailers are offering. Especially on new launches like the iPhone 12, it is well worth searching around to see what other brands…Continue readingThe best Carphone Warehouse iPhone 12 deals and contracts

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Wired

Shady Contracts, Raw Deals: Inside the Industry of Managing Video Game Stars

“I don’t think the work we do falls under the purview of the act, but that act is over 40 years old at this point and really designed to protect talent from predatory practices,” says Swartz. “Regardless, we are quite confident that we do not fall into that category. We are extremely, extremely professional and we’ll be out of business very quickly if we try to take advantage of talent.” One of the only true agencies endemic to this space is Evolved, run by Ryan Morrison, who is also a founding partner of the law firm Morrison Rothman. California’s labor commissioner has vetted Evolved’s contracts, though at one point the firm represented 70 percent of players in the Overwatch League, creating potential conflicts of interests. (Morrisson says his “heart strings got pulled.”). Now he represents a fifth of the league. In a Twitlonger posted on June 23, a former employee of Morrison’s law firms named Ma’idah Lashani accused Morrison of conflicts of interest and sexual harassment, and said that he made inappropriate remarks about a transgender staff member. Morrison Rothman contracted a neutral law firm to investigate the allegations, and in July, announced it had found “no evidence” of sexual misconduct or inappropriate relationships with team owners. “While Mr. Morrison has made mistakes in the past, he has taken and will continue taking considerable steps and actions to improve,” the firm wrote. Lashani says she declined to speak with the investigator because the investigator would not sign a letter ensuring…Continue readingShady Contracts, Raw Deals: Inside the Industry of Managing Video Game Stars

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The Verge

Palantir still relies heavily on government contracts despite push for more corporate customers

Palantir, the controversial analytics and data mining firm, still relies heavily on its US government contracts for revenue despite its public statements that it was branching out into more corporate clients, according to screenshots of the company’s S-1 filing acquired by TechCrunch. The financials, which the New York Times also has viewed, show Palantir has not once turned a profit since its founding in 2003. Add to that the news it’s moving out of Silicon Valley because of “increasing intolerance and monoculture,” and you end up with a picture of a company that doesn’t have a lot of growth potential. It’s now clear Palantir is dependent on the current administration in Washington to maintain its existing revenue streams. Palantir confidentially filed for an IPO last month, but has yet to announce when it will go public. The S-1 filing shows Palantir had revenue of $742.5 million in 2019, a 25 percent increase from the same period a year earlier. But that wasn’t enough to cover expenses; the company had a net loss of $580 million, according to the Times. It has a private market valuation of $20 billion, and has raised more than $3 billion in funding. That net loss is partly explained by how much money Palantir is burning on marketing — the company spent $450 million on marketing in two years. Palantir CEO Peter Thiel has close ties to President Trump As for the increase in revenue, $102 million came from existing Palantir customers, according to TechCrunch’s analysis.…Continue readingPalantir still relies heavily on government contracts despite push for more corporate customers

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TechCrunch

Hear from James Alonso and Adam Zagaris how to draw up your first contracts at Early Stage – TechCrunch

You just got your first customer! You just hired your first employee! You just got your first VC investor! These are huge milestones in the life of a startup and are extraordinarily exciting. That is, until that first draft of the contract arrives in your inbox and you suddenly realize you are 30 pages of legalese away from getting your deal done. Contracts are the foundation for any business, and getting good at negotiating and understanding these instruments is critical for any startup founder. Asking the right questions at just the right moment can be the difference between signing a deal today (and saving those legal fees!) and losing a deal and ending up in a courtroom in the Eastern District of Texas. Given how critical this skill is, we’re excited to bring two seasoned and complementary attorneys to TC Early Stage on July 21 and 22 who are experts at the legal issues facing startups to offer their advice and answer your questions about how to think about business law and how to balance getting the right advice with the financial constraints of early-stage startups. James Alonso is founder and partner at Magnolia Law where he specializes in company formation, venture financing and the law around scaling startups. Meanwhile, Adam Zagaris is the founder and partner of Moonshot Legal, where he specializes in startup laws around areas like commercial transactions, intellectual property and human resources. Together, the two will go into all the different facets of the modern legal…Continue readingHear from James Alonso and Adam Zagaris how to draw up your first contracts at Early Stage – TechCrunch

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The Next Web

Trump contracts Peter Thiel-backed startup to build his (virtual) border wall

Trump’s xenophobic dream of building a “big, beautiful wall” along the Mexico–US border has moved a step closer to (virtual) reality. The White House just struck a deal with Palmer Luckey’s Anduril Industrial to erect an AI-powered partition along the frontier. Anduril will install hundreds of surveillance towers across the rugged terrain, The Washington Post reports. The pillars will use cameras and thermal imaging to detect anyone trying to enter “the land of the free” and send their location to the cellphones of US Border Patrol agents. US Customers and Border Protection confirmed that 200 of the towers would be installed by 2022, although it didn’t mention Anduril by name, nor the cost of the contract. Anduril executives told The Post that the deal is worth several hundred million dollars. “These towers give agents in the field a significant leg up against the criminal networks that facilitate illegal cross-border activity,” said Border Patrol Chief Rodney Scott in a statement. “The more our agents know about what they encounter in the field, the more safely and effectively they can respond.” [Read: Trump’s latest immigration ban is bad news for US AI ambitions] In a description of the system that reads like a vacations brochure, the agency said the towers were “perfectly suited for remote and rural locations” operate with “100 percent renewable energy” and “provide autonomous surveillance operations 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.” Luckey, Thiel, and Trump Notably, the towers don’t use facial recognition. Instead, they detect movement via radar, and then scan…Continue readingTrump contracts Peter Thiel-backed startup to build his (virtual) border wall

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The Verge

Apple is reportedly canceling some Arcade contracts to focus on ‘engagement’

Earlier this year, Apple reportedly canceled several contracts for games that were set to launch on Arcade, the company’s game subscription service known for its library of high-quality titles that don’t have ads or in-app purchases. It allegedly canceled each of them for the same reason: Apple wants new games that will keep players coming back to the service. A report from Bloomberg notes that an Arcade executive told some developers who were on contract that Apple is seeking out games that have a high level of “engagement,” as it was put by one of the publication’s sources. For developers wondering where Apple’s bar for engagement currently lies, the report mentions that an Apple Arcade representative cited Grindstone, Capybara Games’ charming, multilevel puzzler, as a model example. According to this report, Apple paid the affected studios for meeting development milestones, and it told developers that it would work with them in the future if they meet Apple’s requirement for engagement. However, Bloomberg mentions that some of these developers faced financial woes as a result of the canceled contracts. Presumably, these games are allowed to release on other platforms, like Google’s similar Play Pass service for Android devices, though that may not be enough to recoup the losses. According to my colleague Andrew Webster’s interview with indie developers who published games on Apple Arcade, Play Pass pays developers based on user engagement metrics, whereas Apple negotiates deals with developers for their games. The reason why Apple may be changing its requirements…Continue readingApple is reportedly canceling some Arcade contracts to focus on ‘engagement’

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The Verge

Google employees demand the company end police contracts

Over 1,650 Google employees have signed an open letter to CEO Sundar Pichai demanding the company stop selling its technology to police forces across the US. The letter comes as protests against police brutality, spurred by the killing of George Floyd, continue to spread for the fifth straight week. “The past weeks have shown us that addressing racism is not merely an issue of words, but of actions taken to dismantle the actual structures that perpetuate it,” the letter, written by the employee group Googlers Against Racism, reads. “While we as individuals hold difficult but necessary conversations with our family, friends and peers, we are also incredibly disappointed by our company’s response.” “We should not be in the business of criminalizing Black existence while we chant that Black Lives Matter.” Employees are specifically calling out Google’s ongoing Cloud contract with the Clarkstown Police Department in New York, which was sued for allegedly conducting illegal surveillance on Black Lives Matter protestors in 2015. They’re also highlighting the company’s indirect support of a sheriff’s department in Arizona tracking people who cross the US-Mexico border. To workers, the partnerships stand in sharp contrast to the external statements of racial equity that executives like Pichai have been making. While the company has pledged $175 million to support black business owners and job seekers, and YouTube created a $100 million fund to amplify the voices of black creators, it continues to profit from police contracts. “We should not be in the business of criminalizing Black…Continue readingGoogle employees demand the company end police contracts