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Mashable

Netflix’s battle-filled ‘Barbarians’ teaser has some serious ‘Gladiator’ vibes

Back in the early noughties, sword-fighting was all the rage in Hollywood. With the likes of Gladiator, Troy, and Rome filling our screens, the world couldn’t seem to get enough historical, battle-filled epics. And now, 13 years after Rome finished its two-season run, we’re travelling back in time again. On Wednesday, Netflix dropped the teaser for Barbarians, a historical drama series set in 9 AD, during a battle between German tribes and the Roman empire in the Teutoburg forest. Will it be the fill the battle-worn, armor-clad TV void still left by Game of Thrones? Probably not. But with its influx of helmets, horses, and swords, maybe it’ll at least come close to scratching the itch. Barbarians comes to Netflix on Oct. 23. Source linkContinue readingNetflix’s battle-filled ‘Barbarians’ teaser has some serious ‘Gladiator’ vibes

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Wired

Netflix’s ‘Ratched’ Is a Plea for Mental Health Care

As a villain, Nurse Ratched is legendary. That’s not meant to be facetious: She’s No. 5 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 biggest villains of all time (after Hannibal Lecter, Norman Bates, Darth Vader, and the Wicked Witch of the West). As the head nurse in the 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest—and the 1962 Ken Kesey book on which it was based—she runs her psychiatric hospital with seeming cruelty, doling out electroshock therapy and lobotomies as retribution for even the smallest infractions. She is the antithesis of R.P. McMurphy’s fuck rules, man antihero. She also may be the most legendarily misunderstood villain of all time. It’s not that Mildred Ratched doesn’t do extremely unhelpful things to the patients in her care. It’s that the way she’s drawn as a character is, as the scholar Leslie Horst wrote in 1977, a manifestation of “male terror of women who have power.” Cuckoo’s Nest director Milos Forman wrote in his autobiography that Kesey’s novel portrayed her as “an order-mad, killjoy harpy.” As the head nurse, she is the one trying to get McMurphy et al. to conform to psychiatry’s definition of mental fitness. She represents capital-S Society trying to keep them down. It’s easy to forget, though, that while her methods may have been grotesque, she was operating within what she understood to be the parameters of treatment of mental illness at the time. She’s a counterbalance to Kesey’s central question about the nature of sanity. When…Continue readingNetflix’s ‘Ratched’ Is a Plea for Mental Health Care

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Wired

WIRED25: Netflix’s Reed Hastings on Broadening Your Horizons

Thanks to Covid-19, the mantra for 2020 has got to be “quarantine and chill.” Good thing Netflix is here to “entertain people all over the world,” as the company’s cofounder Reed Hastings explained at this year’s WIRED25. Sating the global entertainment palate, though, requires an undying spirit of invention as well as narratives that span both the US and abroad. Netflix’s secret, according to Hasting’s new book No Rules Rules, is that it values its workers over its work process. It’s this employee-centric attitude that allows a startup to maintain a culture of innovation as it grows from, say, a 30-person rent-by-mail DVD provider into the world’s largest streaming service, with a film production arm that rivals Hollywood’s Big Six. SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to WIRED to catch the biggest stories on tech, science, and the future of how we live. The service offers movies and TV shows made in Spain, Germany, Japan, Korea, the UK, Brazil, and more, providing lockdowners with stories from everywhere to everyone. “If you’re a globalist, like I am,” Hastings said in an interview with WIRED editor-in-chief Nick Thompson, “you want to knit the world together and you want people to understand, respect, love, and appreciate each other. And entertainment is a key part of how that happens.” And during a time of rampant nationalism, if culture is the antidote to bigotry, stream on! Hastings’ globalist ethos, however, doesn’t translate to tracking your travel plans for better binge-worthy recommendations. So while the occasional Korean flick might pop…Continue readingWIRED25: Netflix’s Reed Hastings on Broadening Your Horizons

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Mashable

The whole world is watching in the trailer for Netflix’s ‘The Trial Of The Chicago 7’

Do you want an Aaron Sorkin Netflix legal drama about the anti-Vietnam War protesters at the 1968 Democratic Convention who were arrested and charged with conspiracy? You can’t handle an Aaron Sorkin Netflix legal drama about the anti-Vietnam War protesters at the 1968 Democratic Convention who were arrested and charged with conspiracy! Netflix just dropped the trailer for The Trial Of The Chicago 7, the second film Sorkin has both directed and written (2017’s Molly’s Game was the first). The cast is absolutely stacked, with Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Watchmen‘s Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Succession‘s Jeremy Strong, Mark Rylance, Frank Langella, William Hurt, and Michael Keaton, and apparently at least one woman in there somewhere as well (Caitlin FitzGerald from Masters Of Sex, Succession, and Sweetbitter, to be specific). Notably, Cohen plays activist and Yippies movement co-founder Abbie Hoffman — and damn if that line reading at the end of this trailer doesn’t tease some vintage Sorkin courtroom tension. Not to put too fine a point on it, but the chants of “The whole world is watching,” the protesters faced with a phalanx of armed police, and the election-year setting might have a little extra resonance in 2020. The Trial of The Chicago 7 hits Netflix October 16.  Source linkContinue readingThe whole world is watching in the trailer for Netflix’s ‘The Trial Of The Chicago 7’

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TechCrunch

On Netflix’s ‘Selling Sunset’, everyone’s a villain – TechCrunch

“Selling Sunset” is the kind reality TV show that doesn’t bother with things like sympathetic or relatable characters. The Netflix series recently released its third season — which, like the seasons before it, follows the efforts of the largely female staff at a Los Angeles brokerage to sell high-end real estate. As we explain on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast, “Selling Sunset” does make the occasional, perfunctory effort to tug at the heartstrings, but its attention is clearly elsewhere: on the glamorous Hollywood Hills houses up for sale, the ups and downs of the luxury real estate business and especially on the feuds between different factions at the brokerage. It’s the kind of show where the most compelling and memorable characters are the ones who fully embrace their devilish and dramatic side, denouncing their coworkers at every opportunity and adopting tactics like holding a “Burgers and Botox” event to promote their listings. For some of us, these superficial delights were enough to make us like the show; for others, it wasn’t. In addition to discussing the series, we also debated Netflix’s new test of a Shuffle Play feature. You can listen to our review in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us in your podcast player of choice. If you like the show, please let us know by leaving a review on Apple. You can also follow us on Twitter or send us feedback directly. (Or suggest shows and movies for us to review!) If…Continue readingOn Netflix’s ‘Selling Sunset’, everyone’s a villain – TechCrunch

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Engadget

Netflix’s The Irishman will get a Criterion Blu-ray release in November

The Criterion version of the film is a new 4K digital master that Scorsese approved. While it wasn’t explicitly mentioned on its product page, it could mean that the film was mastered in 4K but is only on the Blu-ray disc in 1080p. You may not actually get a 4K UHD (3,840 x 2,160) resolution Blu-ray disc. Also, it doesn’t look like you’re getting new commentary with the physical releases, but you’re still getting extra content typically bundled with Criterion releases. Those extras include a new documentary about the making of the film and a newly edited roundtable conversation between Scorsese and his stars from back in 2019. You’re also getting a 2019 program on the visual effects created for the film entitled The Evolution of Digital De-aging and archival interview excerpts with Frank “the Irishman” Sheeran, the mob hitman de Niro portrayed in the movie. Netflix originally revealed that The Irishman is getting a Criterion release back in January, along with Roma, Marriage Story, American Factory and Atlantics. Roma’s and Marriage Story’s physical Criterion copies are already available for purchase. Source linkContinue readingNetflix’s The Irishman will get a Criterion Blu-ray release in November

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Mashable

Iceland’s Eurovision contestant covers Netflix’s ‘Eurovision’ novelty hit

All products featured here are independently selected by our editors and writers.If you buy something through links on our site, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. By Erin Strecker2020-08-09 13:28:00 UTC If you haven’t yet watched Netflix‘s Eurovision, first of all: What are you doing? Do you hate joy? If you have seen, then you know that one of the best parts of the movie (aside from literally everything Dan Stevens was doing), is the terrible-but-great novelty song “Jaja Ding Dong” that the crowd insists Will Ferrell and Rachel McAdams perform on demand. It’s no surprise, then, that people have been clamoring for Iceland’s real Eurovision 2020 contestant Daði Freyr to cover the tune. Finally, he agreed. “Don’t say I never gave you anything!” he wrote on Twitter. “Now onto the next! <3″ Source linkContinue readingIceland’s Eurovision contestant covers Netflix’s ‘Eurovision’ novelty hit

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Mashable

Netflix’s ‘I’m Thinking of Ending Things:’ Trailer

All products featured here are independently selected by our editors and writers.If you buy something through links on our site, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. By Brooke Bajgrowicz2020-08-06 14:29:46 UTC Though Cindy (Jessie Buckley) is about to head on a trip with her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons) to meet his mom (Toni Collette) and dad (David Thewlis) at their family farm, she’s thinking of ending things. And in the chilling new trailer for Charlie Kaufman’s (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) psychological horror film, she reminds you of this over… and over… and over again. Perhaps she should have walked out because in the movie adaption of Iain Reid’s critically acclaimed novel of the same name, Cindy gets trapped at home during a snowstorm and is forced to deal with a string of strange happenings that cause her to question the world she’s always known. The preview’s creepy music, eerie character choices, and smooth shots have our interests piqued. It hints at an intriguing yet terrifying tale. I’m Thinking of Ending Things premieres on Netflix September 4. Source linkContinue readingNetflix’s ‘I’m Thinking of Ending Things:’ Trailer

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Mashable

Netflix’s ‘Immigration Nation’ is a must-watch reckoning: Review

“It’s not personal. It’s business.” Image: netflix All products featured here are independently selected by our editors and writers.If you buy something through links on our site, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. By Alison Foreman2020-08-05 00:28:58 UTC Six hours of a stranger’s time is a big ask, especially if you’re vouching for a show you haven’t seen yet. But leading up to the August 3 release of Netflix’s Immigration Nation, plenty of people ventured out on that limb to promote the series on social media. This came after one of its main subjects, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), sought to block the project’s release and threatened legal action against its creators. Now, it’s all too clear what the agency took issue with — and the series’ amplification has become even more important. ‘Immigration Nation’ is most threatening to Trump because it is fair, thorough, and true. Directed by Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwartz, the six-part docuseries began production shortly after the Trump administration took office and, for a time, had the rare support of ICE and other administration officials. Unlike other impactful documentaries released in recent years, Immigration Nation didn’t purport a specific agenda during production; even its title is ambiguous enough to make one believe the project could fall on either side of the contentious debate it covers.  The belief that such objectivity would promise ICE a kind of fair shake is likely what gained Clusiau and Schwartz their unprecedented access, allowing the pair to witness immigration…Continue readingNetflix’s ‘Immigration Nation’ is a must-watch reckoning: Review

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TechCrunch

Netflix’s ‘Say I Do’ offers a wedding-focused twist on the ‘Queer Eye’ formula – TechCrunch

Parts of “Say I Do,” a new reality series on Netflix, will feel pretty familiar to fans of the streaming service’s popular reboot of “Queer Eye.” Like “Queer Eye,” “Say I Do” stars gay men who are experts in a particular field — in this case, interior designer Jeremiah Brent, fashion designer Thai Nguyen and chef Gabriele Bertaccini. In each episode, the trio is given the only-on-reality-TV task of organizing an elaborate wedding in a single week. And usually, just one half of the lucky couple knows about the wedding until a few days before it’s scheduled to take place. As we explain on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast, it’s hard to resist comparisons to “Queer Eye,” particularly since “Queer Eye” creator David Collins is an executive producer on the new show. But “Say I Do” has its own unique charms. Although its hosts aren’t quite as aggressively charismatic as the Fab Five, the trio won us over quite effectively, thanks to a combination of impressive wedding planning and convincing emotional engagement. Put another way: Nearly every episode ends with its hosts quietly wiping away tears, and the audience will probably find itself joining in, as “Say I Do”‘s focus on weddings proves to be a reliable template for cathartic conversations. In addition to our review, we also discuss this year’s Emmys, which saw Netflix receiving a record number of nominations. You can listen to our review in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us…Continue readingNetflix’s ‘Say I Do’ offers a wedding-focused twist on the ‘Queer Eye’ formula – TechCrunch