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The Verge

Google is still paying Apple billions to be the default search engine in Safari


UK regulators are scrutinizing a longstanding deal between Apple and Google over the default search engine in the iPhone maker’s mobile Safari browser, reports Reuters.

According to an updated report compiled by the UK government’s Competition and Markets Authority, Google pays Apple a “substantial majority” of the £1.2 billion (roughly $1.5 billion) it pays every year in the UK alone for so-called default positions, in other words when Google pays a company to make its search engine the go-to one in a browser or other platform. Read More

Categories
The Next Web

MacOS security bug could allow a bogus version of Safari to steal your data

Last year, Apple expanded its security bounty program to include macOS after several years of offering the same for iPhone developers. But according to at least one researcher, the company isn’t acting quick enough on some exploits.

Developer Jeff Johnson informed Apple about an exploit that allowed an attacker to steal private data with a malicious clone of Safari over six months ago. Once a user is tricked into downloading the malicious file, the Safari clone is given undue access by macOS. Any restricted file available to Safari then becomes available to the attacker. Read More

Categories
Engadget

Safari in macOS Big Sur will stream Netflix in 4K HDR


MacOS Big Sur may be a worthwhile upgrade if you love to marathon TV shows. As 9to5Mac reports, users have discovered that Safari in Big Sur will play Netflix videos in 4K with HDR, whether you’re using Dolby Vision or HDR10. You won’t have to switch to another browser just to see more than a plain 1080p image. The upgrade comes thanks to long-expected support for HEVC in Apple’s web browser.

You’ll have to be picky about your choice of Mac if you want the full effect, either with the Big Sur beta or the finished release this fall. HDR is currently only supported with 2018 or later MacBook Pro models, 2018 or later Mac mini systems, the iMac Pro or the Mac Pro. You’ll need an HDR-capable monitor for the Mac mini and Mac Pro, too. Read More

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Engadget

Safari will use Face ID and Touch ID for ‘frictionless’ web sign-ins


The Face ID and Touch ID features on Apple devices will soon be much more useful on the web. As TechCrunch reports, Apple has outlined how Safari 14 for iOS, iPadOS and macOS will allow using those biometric authentication methods for “frictionless” sign-ins on websites. You may not have to enter your username and password (or rely on a password manager) after the first time you punch them in.

The approach is built on the familiar Web Authentication (WebAuthn) framework from the FIDO2 spec. It’s been used for biometric sign-ins in the past, but Safari 14 will clearly expand that technology to a large portion of the Apple ecosystem once web developers make use of it. Read More

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Engadget

Apple’s new tools can help developers port Chrome extensions to Safari


When Apple detailed macOS Big Sur earlier this week, it spent a lot of time talking about how it redesigned the desktop operating system to make it look more modern. The company also touched on upcoming enhancements to Safari, such as faster webpage loading times and enhanced privacy monitoring. But the one feature that will likely mean the most for Safari users is Apple’s take on the WebExtensions API. The move promises to significantly increase the number and variety of plug-ins you’ll be able to install if you use Safari as your primary web browser. And we now have a better idea of how they’ll work thanks to a WWDC session spotted by TechCrunch. Read More

Categories
The Next Web

Safari will soon log you into websites with Face ID and Touch ID

Earlier this year, Apple joined thethe Fast Identity Online (FIDO) alliance to support passwordless authentication. Now, we’re seeing the first big announcement related to this development: the upcoming Safari 14 will support passwordless authentication. Apple made this announcement at a recent session during its developer conference WWDC.

What does it mean for you? You can sign into websites on Safari using your iPhone‘s Face ID or Touch ID. Additionally, you can use hardware security keys that support FIDO standards for authentication as well. One example is Yubikey, which offers dual-connector authenticator with lightning and USB-C support. Read More

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ZDNet

Safari 14 removes Flash, gets support for breach alerts, HTTP/3, and WebP


After the flashy presentations of WWDC 2020, Apple has now published more details about some of the new features that are coming to some of its products.

While Safari didn’t get too much of the spotlight at WWDC, Safari 14, scheduled to be released later this fall with iOS 14 and macOS 11, is a release that is packed choke-full with features.

WebExtensions API

The biggest and most important of the new additions is support for WebExtensions, a technology for creating browser extensions.

The WebExtension API was initially developed for Chrome but has since been also adopted to Firefox, Opera, Vivaldi, and Edge, and has become the universal standard for creating cross-browser add-ons using common technologies like HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Read More

Categories
Wired

Apple Pushes Back Against Ad Tracking in Safari and iOS 14


“This year we wanted to help you with tracking in apps,” said Katie Skinner, a user privacy software manager at Apple during the keynote. “We believe tracking should always be transparent and under your control. So moving forward, App Store policy will require apps to ask before tracking you across apps and websites owned by other companies.”

In iOS 14, you’ll see a prompt when an app is trying to track you across other services. You’ll have the option to “Allow Tracking” or “Ask App Not to Track.” It’s notable that “asking” seems different from “blocking,” but Apple says in its notes to developers that they will need this permission from users to conduct external tracking. An Apple spokesperson specifically told WIRED that if a user doesn’t consent to tracking, the app won’t be able to access a type of identifier often used in targeted advertising and other tracking called the IDFA identifier. This would likely be similar to invoking the existing iOS feature “Limit Ad Tracking,” which zeros out a user’s IDFA number, but doesn’t preclude tracking with other identifiers. Read More