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VentureBeat

How high refresh and frame rates will change phone screens and cameras


Though 2020 will be remembered for many things, one of the year’s noteworthy smartphone device trends — broad availability of “120Hz” screens — could slip under the mainstream radar, mostly because average consumers have no idea what Hz (“Hertz”) means. Displays targeted at gamers and creative professionals adopted 120Hz technology several years ago, sometimes referring to “120Hz refresh rates,” and in 2020, even budget smartphones will include “120Hz display support.”

What that means is that smartphone users at $300-$400 price points are about to have access to the imperceptibly fast display technologies that were once restricted to high-end computers and tablets, right at the same time higher frame rate cameras are becoming increasingly popular on phones. Today, I’m going to simplify this complex topic, and explain why it actually matters when a screen moves from 30Hz to 60Hz or 120Hz refresh rates — as well as when it’s overkill. Read More

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The Next Web

Apple making folding iPhone with separate but ‘seamless’ screens


As if a supposed leak of iPhone 12 molds today wasn’t enough, another big rumor about upcoming Apple devices has surfaced: The company apparently is apparently working on a foldable iPhone with two separate but ‘fairly continuos’ panels.

The rumor comes courtesy of leaker Jon Prosser, who claims the current prototype device has not a single bendable display but rather two panels on a hinge:

The memes are funny — but it doesn’t look like they just stuck two phones together.

Even though they’re two separate panels, when the displays are extended, it looks fairly continuous and seamless. Read More

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The Next Web

From start screens to coin counters — a guide to video game UI


Sixty years ago the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY held an open house. Visitors who toured the lab were treated to an interactive exhibit, a game titled Tennis for Two. The setup was simple—a 5-inch analog display and two controllers, each with one knob and one button. The world’s first video game was born, but after two years, the exhibit was closed.

Twelve years passed, and an eerily similar arcade game showed up in a bar called Andy Capp’s Tavern. The name of the game? Pong. Its maker? Atari. Seemingly overnight, the burgeoning world of video games was transformed. Novelty became industry. Read More