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Engadget

‘League of Legends’ championship will start in Shanghai despite pandemic


The company is clearly following the practices of conventional sports that have relied on limited travel and virtual fans to minimize the risk of infections, but that also means it shares some of the same issues. While a single city reduces travel, it doesn’t eliminate travel — teams will have to fly across the planet to participate. There are also no mentions of whether or not teams will live in a “bubble,” how often they’ll be tested for COVID-19, or what happens if players get sick. Read More

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Tech Radar

Windows 10’s next update could come with bigger changes including a new Start menu

Windows 10’s next update due to land later this year (referred to as 20H2) was expected to be just a service pack-style upgrade, mirroring what happened in the second half of 2019 – but it seems that the update won’t just offer minor changes, but some bigger introductions.

This appears to be the case because Microsoft has just released a new preview version for Windows 10 (20H2) which carries the new Start menu that has previously been tested in the dev channel, among a number of other more sizeable alterations to the OS. Read More

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Engadget

Microsoft’s next-gen Xbox promise was trouble from the start


The gap between the Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 for cross-platform titles will likely be real, though it’s not going to be as severe as the XB1X/PS4 Pro divide. Despite this, though, during the all-important launch window, it’s likely that we’ll see PlayStation 5 exclusive titles that simply look better than Xbox Series X exclusive titles.

You can see this in Halo Infinite, which looks like a 4K remaster of a Xbox One launch game. Now, some of that comes down to art direction and wanting to produce a game that recalls the Halo series’ legacy. There are also promises that it’ll “get better,” but the game looks like an upscaled Xbox One game because it is, in fact, built to run on an Xbox One. Microsoft can’t afford to release a first-party game that struggles to run on its own hardware, which means that the ambition of Infinite has to take a hit. Read More

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Engadget

Gmail is about to start testing verification-like logos for email


Google has announced a slew of security enhancements headed for G Suite services, including some we’ve heard about like admin changes for Google Meet, but one of the biggest announcements is all about Gmail. Last year Google announced it joined the Brand Indicators for Message Identification (BIMI) group (Verizon Media, the parent company of Engadget, is also a part of the group), which is pushing an email spec that adds brand logos to authenticated emails.

In practice it seems a lot like the verified stamps that have proliferated across social media, but when you see them it won’t be a blue check, it will be the logo of the company the sent the email, as shown above with CNN. Emails are authenticated using the existing DMARC system and then there’s certification that applies the associated logo, which hopefully gives people trust an email came from the company or person it’s claiming to represent. Read More

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Engadget

Lenovo’s new budget AMD gaming laptops start at $660


Also on deck is a seemingly potent budget rig, the IdeaPad Gaming 3. Yes, another one: Lenovo released an Intel-powered laptop with a very similar name earlier this year. If you can get past the nomenclature, you’ll find a machine with a 15.6-inch, full HD display you can trick out with the Ryzen 7 4800H, an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Ti GPU, up to 32 GB of DDR4-3200 RAM and up to 1TB of SSD storage. (That’s right, you can squeeze more RAM into this thing than the Legion 5.)

For those with a little more wiggle room in their budget, bumping that standard display up to a 120Hz panel is an option, though Lenovo hasn’t confirmed to us exactly how much that screen swap will cost. Cost-conscious gamers may wind up skipping out on that, though, especially since its base price is tantalizing as-is: These AMD models will go on sale this month starting at $660. Read More

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Engadget

Overwatch League’s online-only playoffs start on September 3rd


To limit server lag, the North American teams will travel to Asia. While they won’t compete in person, there will be a break before the playoffs resume. “Before the four finalists can face off, we will need a few weeks for health and safety needs and to account for travel logistics,” Blizzard said.

Summer, Summer, Summer 💪

Relive all of the #OWL2020 Summer Showdown action, and stay tuned for the Best of The Finals 👉 https://t.co/0tBmsyMFus pic.twitter.com/2Pf0HcQTGA

— Overwatch League (@overwatchleague) July 10, 2020 Read More

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Wired

Will the Hydrogen Revolution Start in a Garbage Dump?


A sprawling ziggurat stuffed with 130 million tons of trash cuts into the hills above East Los Angeles, towering over the city like a monument to American excess. The Puente Hills Landfill hasn’t accepted new waste in nearly a decade, but it remains the largest dump in America and a significant producer of greenhouse gases. Every minute, Puente Hills releases 30,000 cubic feet of landfill gas, a noxious mixture of carbon dioxide and methane created by microbes devouring the dump’s organic matter. Read More

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Tech Radar

Call of Duty: Mobile Season 8 start date, characters, new modes and battle pass

Call of Duty: Mobile Season 8 is officially underway, but what can you expect from the game’s latest update?

Called ‘The Forge’, Season 8 brings rewards for both free and premium players who pay for the battle pass. You can unlock the brand new DR-H assault rifle for free if you reach tier 21, and premium players can enjoy a whole host of unlockables such as new skins for Tank Dempsey and Krueger.

When does Call of Duty: Mobile Season 8 start?

Call of Duty: Mobile Season 8 has now started. Season 7 ended on July 9, so the new update fell in line with the game’s usual pattern of introducing the battle pass a few days later. Read More

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VentureBeat

Salesforce chief scientist Richard Socher leaves to start his own company


Take the latest VB Survey to share how your company is implementing AI today.

Richard Socher today announced that he’s leaving his position as chief scientist at Salesforce to create his own startup company. During four years as chief scientist, Socher oversaw research and development initiatives as well as the rise of Einstein cloud AI services for use cases like computer vision, natural language models, translation, and personalized CRM search results.

Socher came to Salesforce following the acquisition of MetaMind in 2016, a company he founded and led as CEO. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. MetaMind is one of a number of startups to spin out of the ImageNet competition for large-scale computer vision models, which took place from 2010 to 2017. As a Ph.D. student at Stanford University, Socher helped create the ImageNet data set. Read More

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The Next Web

Australia to start paying EV owners for transferring electricity back to the national grid


Electric vehicles can help keep the air clean in our cities – as we’ve seen recently with the reduction of traffic through COVID-19 lockdowns – but they face two obstacles.

In the short term they’re still expensive. In the long term charging millions of vehicles from the electricity grid presents challenges.

I’m part of a new project, launched today, that tackles both of these obstacles head-on, and it could mean owners earn more money than they’re likely to pay for charging their electric vehicles. Read More