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Wired

The 5 Best Bike Locks: U-Locks, Chain Locks, and Tips (2020)

Whichever lock you go with, make sure it loops around your lock-up point—bike rack, secure fence, etc.—and through the triangular part of your bike frame, and through the spokes of your rear wheel. Two locks are always the most secure, but few people want to buy and carry two locks everywhere they ride. Ideally, a second lock would go through the front wheel to the lock-up point, because it’s very common for thieves to steal an unsecured front wheel, especially if it’s a quick-release design, and front wheels are expensive to replace. That’s why I liked the Kryptonite Evolution Mini-7, which comes with an extra cable built into what’s a decently safe U-lock. Keep your U-lock away from the ground when it’s locked to your bike. Thieves like to take a bottle jack, normally for jacking up a car, and place it inside the “U.” Then with enough pumping, it breaks the lock open. If you get the U-lock away from the ground, it makes it hard for them to do this. You also want to get a U-lock that has as little extra space inside the “U” as possible. The less extra space, the less room there is for thieves to manipulate the tools needed to cut through it. Oh yeah, and inspect your lock-up spot before you decide to park there. Thieves are known to dislodge poles and sign posts from the ground and then place them back in the hole, so all they have to do is…Continue readingThe 5 Best Bike Locks: U-Locks, Chain Locks, and Tips (2020)

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Wired

The 5 Best Photo Printing Services (2020): Tips, Recommendations, and More

Printique is also on the pricier end, but the extra money gets you much better prints. I went for the Kodak Endura Luster paper (which is also what Mpix uses). Colors are very true to life, with rich blacks and good details in both shadows and highlights. Another place Printique shines is the photo upload process. You can import images from just about anywhere, including Lightroom, Flickr, Instagram, Google Photos, Facebook, and Dropbox, or directly from your computer. 25 4 x 6 Prints From Printique Cost $7.75 ($.31 Per Print) Best on a Budget Snapfish If you don’t have a lot of money to spend, but you still want good-looking prints, Snapfish delivers. Snapfish doesn’t offer the same quality of prints you’ll find in our top picks, but it’s also less than a third the price and the results are not bad. You can upload images from your computer, phone, or import them directly from social media (Facebook, Instagram, Google Photos, or Flickr). The web interface is easy to use, though as with most of the cheaper services, you’ll be constantly bombarded with upsells for books, mugs, and more. I was surprised by the quality of prints from Snapfish considering the price. They’re better than what I got from several other services (not reviewed here) that charged more than double. 25 4 x 6 Prints From Snapfish Cost $2.75 ($.09 Per Print) Best for Books Shutterfly I’ve used Shutterfly to create everything from calendars to books and have been happy…Continue readingThe 5 Best Photo Printing Services (2020): Tips, Recommendations, and More

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VentureBeat

Foursquare’s Marsbot for AirPods offers location-aware audio tips

Although augmented reality is most commonly associated with overlaying digital imagery and information on top of the real world, researchers have continued to explore potential audio applications of AR, generally using headphones or audio-backed glasses to weave data into a wearer’s exploration of spaces. On October 20, Foursquare will jump into the audio AR field with Marsbot for AirPods, a “lightweight virtual assistant” that whispers location-specific guidance into your ear as you walk through unfamiliar places. Digital assistants have gone mainstream over the past decade as Google’s Assistant leveraged cloud servers to proactively organize users’ emails and calendars, Amazon’s Alexa facilitated frictionless voice-controlled shopping, and Apple’s Siri promoted on-device processing to reduce user privacy concerns. But for better and worse, these assistants have been passive — evoked only on request — and non-persistent in the sense that they otherwise stay silent. Inspired by Scarlett Johansson’s humanlike AI assistant in the movie Her, Foursquare is exploring how a more active and location-aware virtual aide could work if it was always able to communicate with you, using audio cues rather than on-screen notifications as flags. The AirPods project builds on the company’s prior Marsbot, which uses text messages to offer location-aware tips. Walking through New York City with Marsbot for AirPods, users will hear tips automatically surfaced for specific nearby locations, attractions, and people, ranging from the rating of a restaurant to the presence of a Foursquare contact. Some of the tips are provided directly by Foursquare, including useful facts that might draw…Continue readingFoursquare’s Marsbot for AirPods offers location-aware audio tips

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Wired

Want Some Eco-Friendly Tips? A New Study Says No, You Don’t

This story originally appeared on Grist and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Need something else for your growing to-do list? Environmentalists have about a zillion things for you, give or take. Chances are that you’ve heard a lot of them already: Ditch your car for a bike, take fewer flights, and go vegan. Oh, and install solar panels on your roof, dry your laundry on a clothesline, use less water when you brush your teeth, take shorter showers … hey, where are you going? We’re just getting started! For decades, we’ve been told that the solution to our planetary crisis starts with us. These “simple” tips are so pervasive, they usually go unquestioned. But that doesn’t mean that most people have the time or motivation to heed them. In fact, new research suggests that hearing eco-friendly tips like these actually makes people less likely to do anything about climate change. Oops! Experts say there are better ways to get people to adopt green habits—and they don’t involve nagging or guilt-tripping. In the study—titled “Don’t Tell Me What to Do”—researchers at Georgia State University surveyed nearly 2,000 people online to see how they would respond to different messages about climate change. Some saw messages about personal sacrifices, like using less hot water. Others saw statements about policy actions, like laws that would limit carbon emissions, stop deforestation, or increase fuel efficiency standards for cars. The messenger—whether scientist or not—didn’t make much of a difference. Then the respondents were asked…Continue readingWant Some Eco-Friendly Tips? A New Study Says No, You Don’t

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Wired

Amazon Prime Day 2020: 17 Best Early Deals and Shopping Tips

When Prime Day was first announced in 2015, it was swiftly and brutally roasted. No one thought Amazon could get away with making up a holiday. By year two, we at WIRED had changed our tune, and five years later, Prime Day is so big that Amazon makes more money from it than Black Friday and Cyber Monday. The day has slowly expanded into 48 full hours of deals too. The Prime Day 2020* sale starts on October 13 at 12:01 am PT, and it ends on October 14 at 11:59 pm PT. As usual, WIRED will cover the discount madness, sifting through the offerings to pull out the best Prime Day deals. We’ll keep a close eye on the inevitable competing sales from the likes of Walmart, Target, and Best Buy too. Below you’ll find our favorite early deals you can shop right now, along with some expert advice to help you keep a cool head once the sales officially start. Note: We strikethrough deals that sell out or are momentarily unavailable at their discounted price. But deals sometimes return, and items may be restrocked faster than we can update, so it never hurts to check for yourself. Updated October 12: We added a few new deals, including some from non-Amazon stores, and verified existing discounts. *If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission. This helps support our journalism. Learn more. First, Some Prime Day Tips Sign Up for Prime: You can’t access…Continue readingAmazon Prime Day 2020: 17 Best Early Deals and Shopping Tips

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The Next Web

10 simple Python tips to speed up your data analysis

A dash of magic Magic commands are a set of convenient functions in Jupyter Notebooks that are designed to solve some of the common problems in standard data analysis. You can see all available magics with the help of %lsmagic. List of all available magic functions Magic commands are of two kinds: line magics, which are prefixed by a single % character and operate on a single line of input, and cell magics, which are associated with the double %% prefix and operate on multiple lines of input. Magic functions are callable without having to type the initial % if set to 1. Let’s look at some of them that might be useful in common data analysis tasks: %pastebin uploads code to Pastebin and returns the URL. Pastebin is an online content hosting service where we can store plain text like source code snippets and then the URL can be shared with others. In fact, Github gist is also akin to pastebin albeit with version control. Consider a python script file.py with the following content: Using %pastebin in Jupyter Notebook generates a pastebin url. The %matplotlib inline function is used to render the static matplotlib plots within the Jupyter notebook. Try replacing the inline part with notebook to get zoom-able & resize-able plots, easily. Make sure the function is called before importing the matplotlib library. %matplotlib inline vs %matplotlib notebook The %run function runs a python script inside a notebook. %%writefile writes the contents of a cell to a file. Here the code will be written to a file named foo.py and saved in the current directory. The %%latex function renders the cell contents as LaTeX. It is…Continue reading10 simple Python tips to speed up your data analysis

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Tech Radar

Three tips to implement Kubernetes with open standards

The technologies chosen by enterprise IT departments today will have a long-term impact on their performance, operations and overall strategy. Sometimes it can take well over a decade to realize the full implications of a technology solution. This can put a great deal of weight on the shoulders of IT management, especially when it comes to emergent technologies whose utility, importance and trajectory may not yet be fully known. Placing a bad bet on new software can lead to difficult integrations and disruptions across an organisation’s entire tech stack, which in the long-term can lead to lost productivity, wasted budgets, and the likelihood of losing ground to competitors. Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration platform, was until recently regarded in the same way, with IT departments struggling to fully appraise its long-term value. However, with Kubernetes now running 86 per cent of container clusters, it has emerged as the de facto standard for cloud-native infrastructure. This means that the main concern for IT departments is not whether Kubernetes has a future, but how to ensure that their implementation of Kubernetes has a future which doesn’t present a bottleneck to integrations, industry practices and use cases. That’s where open standards – codifying how people are implementing Kubernetes and best practices – are integral to the integration. Following these standards can help to prevent teams from running into unexpected implementation roadblocks, and helps to ensure the easiest possible learning curve for new members of their DevOps teams. By drawing upon open standards…Continue readingThree tips to implement Kubernetes with open standards

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Wired

5 Best Password Managers of 2020: Features, Pricing, and Tips

There are apps for Android, iOS, Windows, MacOS, and Linux, as well as extensions for all major web browsers, plus less common options like Opera, Brave, and Vivaldi (which all support Chrome extensions). Bitwarden also recently added support for Windows Hello and Touch ID to its desktop apps for Windows and macOS, giving you the added security of those biometric systems. Another thing I like is BitWarden’s semiautomated password fill-in tool. If you visit a site that you’ve saved credentials for, Bitwarden’s browser icon shows the number of saved credentials from that site. Click the icon and it will ask which account you want to use and then automatically fill in the login form. This makes it easy to switch between usernames and avoids the pitfalls of autofill we mention at the bottom of this guide. If you simply must have your fully automated form-filling, Bitwarden supports that as well. Bitwarden offers a paid upgrade account. The cheapest of the bunch, Bitwarden Premium, is $10 per year. That gets you 1 GB of encrypted file storage, two-factor authentication with devices like YubiKey, FIDO U2F, Duo, and a password hygiene and vault health report. Paying also gets you priority customer support. Bitwarden is free ($10 per year for families) After signing up, download the app for Windows, MacOS, Android, iOS, or Linux. There are also browser extensions for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Edge, Vivaldi, and Brave. Best Full-Featured Manager Dashlane Screenshot: Dashlane I first encountered Dashlane several years ago. Back then, it…Continue reading5 Best Password Managers of 2020: Features, Pricing, and Tips

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Wired

How to Plan a Road Trip During the Pandemic: Gear and Tips

You might have had to cancel your trip to Hawaii, but you can still go on an end-of-summer expedition. Source linkContinue readingHow to Plan a Road Trip During the Pandemic: Gear and Tips

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Wired

The NSA’s Tips to Keep Your Phone From Tracking You

This week marked the first-ever online-only Black Hat and Defcon security conferences, both of which still produced impactful work despite going remote. But before you dive into everything that’s broken, start off with a tale of perseverance that starts with the private keys needed to recover $300,000 of bitcoin trapped in an old zip file. Dutch researchers figured out how to mess with traffic lights across at least 10 cities in the Netherlands. At most they could have caused a few traffic jams—not multicar pileups—but it’s an important reminder about the potential fragility of connected city infrastructure. Also fragile: a file type known as Symbolic Link, which gave Apple hacker Patrick Wardle the foothold he needed to compromise macOS in a since-patched vulnerability chain. After months of qualifying rounds, the US Air Force’s Hack-a-Sat finals arrived, albeit remotely thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic. And speaking of satellites, hackers have built cheap ground stations that allow anyone to intercept their transmissions. Neat! We also took a look at how IoT botnets made from high-wattage machines like home appliances could potentially be used to game the energy markets. Decades-old flaws in email protocols make it possible for anyone to hide their true identity, a scary thought given the prevalence of high-stakes phishing attacks. And hackers took over dozens of subreddits Friday, plastering their pages with MAGA imagery and comments. We talked to former national intelligence official Sue Gordon about how to prevent the next “Cyber 9/11.” We explained why the Trump administration’s…Continue readingThe NSA’s Tips to Keep Your Phone From Tracking You