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Wired

Anime Avatars Are Going Mainstream on Twitch


“I will never have to work out again!” Twitch streamer Imane “Pokimane” Anys said on her stream Sunday. She zoomed the camera out to show her full form: waved brown hair, enormous teak eyes, and a cropped purple top showing a flat tummy. Anime as hell, all of it.

In lieu of her face, Anys had commissioned a 3D anime model of herself that tracked her words and movements, enacting them live. Anys was scrolling through Reddit and chatting with viewers, as usual, when one asked what in God’s name was going on. “Usually I stream with a cam,” said Anys matter-of-factly. “Sometimes if I don’t want to use a cam, maybe I’ll just use this! Nyah!” Her 3D model’s eyes closed, looking like a complacent cat’s. Read More

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The Next Web

The classic game of chess has found a new home: Twitch


As a global pandemic continues to determine a new normal, tens of thousands of viewers have been tuning in to watch people play chess on a livestreaming website called Twitch.tv. An American chess grandmaster, Hikaru Nakamura, along with a number of celebrities of the video game world, is leading a renaissance in the ancient game.

While viewers eagerly await Nakamura’s streams to begin, they are treated to a slideshow of memes involving Nakamura’s face superimposed into scenes from pop culture. First, a reference to a well-known Japanese animation, next a famous upside-down kiss with Spiderman and finally, Nakamura’s characteristic grin is edited onto the Mona Lisa herself. Read More

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The Verge

Karaoke game Twitch Sings will shut down at the end of the year


Twitch Sings, the streaming platform’s live karaoke game, is shutting down, the company announced. The company says it decided to close down the game effective January 1st, 2021 in order to “invest in broader tools and services that will help support and grow the entire music community on Twitch.”

Twitch Sings launched in April 2019, and let streamers choose a song from its library to perform. Singers could belt one out solo or get friends to join for a duet. The channel doesn’t seem to have attracted a huge audience, however; while Twitch’s overall Music category has more than 3 million followers, Twitch Sings only accounted for 161,000 of those followers. Read More

Categories
Engadget

Twitch will shut down its live karaoke game on January 1st


Twitch Sings will bid karaoke fans farewell after 2020. The Amazon subsidiary has announced that it’s shutting down the live karaoke game on January 1st, 2021, less than two years after it was officially launched. In its announcement, Twitch says it decided to close the platform to “invest in broader tools and services that will help support and grow the entire music community on Twitch.”

Streamers can play Twitch Sings by choosing one of the game’s available songs, giving their fans the power to choose what they should sing or asking friends or fans to join them for duets. As PC Gamer notes, though, the Twitch Sings channel only has 161,000 followers, even though the Music category it’s under has 3.6 million. It sounds like the platform decided to redirect its resources, because the game wasn’t exactly contributing to its growth in the music department. Read More

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The Next Web

Twitch’s karaoke game, Twitch Sings, will shut down by New Years

Twitch today announced it’s shutting down Twitch Sings, the built-in karaoke streaming feature it announced two years ago. While the exact reason it’s closing isn’t exactly clear, it might have something to do with the copyright struggles the site’s been having for the last few months.

We’ve made the difficult decision to close Twitch Sings on January 1, 2021 to invest in broader tools and music services on Twitch. Thank you for rocking our world. For more info: https://t.co/ItImv3u75v pic.twitter.com/jJqICzp8Ul Read More

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The Next Web

Ninja and Shroud return to Twitch

Now that Microsoft has closed Mixer for good, its streamers have to decide once and for all where they’re going. Two of Mixer‘s biggest stars — who both used to be two of Twitch’s biggest stars — have returned to their former platform to much rejoicing. While Twitch may not have been a perfect home, this shows it’s still the biggest game in town.

Tyler “Ninja” Blevins and Michael “Shroud” Grzesiek both made surprise jumps to Mixer last year — Ninja in August, Shroud in October. At the time, it seemed like an almost inexplicable move, given how popular both were on Amazon’s platform. Ninja was Twitch’s golden boy, its most popular streamer by far, and Shroud wasn’t much less so. But both of them expressed misgivings with Amazon’s platforms — generally speaking, both said they felt they could more easily connect with their fans on Mixer. Ninja and his wife Jessica both reported problems with Twitch staff and a limited ability to grow on the platform. There are also reports that a truly enormous amount of money changed hands in both cases. Read More

Categories
Engadget

Shroud returns to Twitch under a new, exclusive deal


Shroud’s homecoming stream will go live on August 12th at 11am PT.

Shroud was one of many high-profile streamers who jumped ship from Twitch in fall 2019, mainly to sign exclusive deals with Microsoft’s rival streaming platform, Mixer. He was one of the most prominent names on the list, alongside Tyler “Ninja” Blevins.

Microsoft unceremoniously shut down Mixer in July, less than a year after signing numerous multimillion deals with streamers. This left Shroud, Ninja and other big names up for grabs, and it’s been a waiting game to see where they all land. Facebook Gaming reportedly offered both Shroud and Ninja “almost double” the value of their Mixer contracts, though they both refused early on, according to esports lawyer Rod Breslau. He said Shroud’s Mixer contract was worth $10 million, while Ninja’s came in at $30 million. Read More

Categories
Tech Radar

Twitch Prime is now Prime Gaming, will keep serving up free gaming goodies

It’s official: Amazon has rebranded its video game-focused Twitch Prime service, which will now be known as Prime Gaming going forward.

The rebrand will bring the company’s video game offering into line with most of the other services included with an Amazon Prime membership, such as Prime Video and Prime Reading (for the moment, Amazon Music remains the sole exception).

Although the service’s name and branding have been updated, Amazon has moved to assure users that Prime Gaming will continue to offer the same free goodies as Twitch Prime before it. Read More

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The Next Web

Amazon relaunches Twitch Prime as Prime Gaming

Amazon today announced it’d be renaming its Twitch-based extras program for Amazon Prime subscribers. So goodbye, Twitch Prime. Hello, Prime Gaming.

Bezos’s baby has been making more of a push into the gaming industry in the last year or so. It’s making more games, for starters. While its summer release Crucible came with almost no fanfare and its upcoming MMO New World has been pushed back to next year, it’s definitely hungry for some more of the gaming market. And there’s of course Twitch, which has become even more essential to the gaming community recently, especially after the fall of Mixer. Read More

Categories
VentureBeat

Amazon rebrands Twitch Prime as Prime Gaming to broaden audience


Amazon has rebranded its Twitch Prime membership benefits program as Prime Gaming. The move is part of an attempt to broaden the appeal of the benefits to players who don’t have Twitch livestreaming accounts or don’t consider themselves to be enthusiast gamers.

One of the little-known secrets about Twitch Prime is that you are a member already if you have an Amazon Prime subscription, which entitles you to benefits such as free shipping, discounts on a lot of products, and so on. That stays the same with Prime Gaming. One of the big changes is that you no longer need a Twitch account ID in order to get the benefits, Prime Gaming general manager Larry Plotnick said in an interview with GamesBeat. Read More