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The Verge

Researchers become their own lab rats with DIY coronavirus vaccine


Vaccine trials have had a weird week. First, there was the exhilarating kickoff of two massive clinical trials for vaccines created by Moderna and Pfizer. Each company is hoping to recruit 30,000 volunteers to test whether its vaccine is effective and safe. This is normal.

What’s not normal is a bunch of researchers in Boston who have decided to test a DIY coronavirus vaccine on themselves. At least 20 people have mixed together the vaccine and sprayed it up their noses as part of what they’re calling the Rapid Deployment Vaccine Collaborative (Radvac), according to a truly wild MIT Technology Review story from editor Antonio Regalado. Read More

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VentureBeat

MIT CSAIL employs machine learning to optimize vaccine designs


A study coauthored by researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) describes an open source system that introduces methods for designing, evaluating, and augmenting both new and existing vaccine designs. The system — OptiVax — leverages machine learning to select short strings of amino acids called peptides that are predicted to provide high population coverage for a vaccine.

Fewer than 12% of all drugs entering clinical trials end up in pharmacies, and it takes at least 10 years for medicines to complete the journey from discovery to the marketplace. Clinical trials alone take six to seven years, on average, putting the cost of R&D at roughly $2.6 billion, according to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. Read More

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The Next Web

Russian cyberspies are attempting to steal coronavirus vaccine information


A Russian cyberespionage group that hacked into election networks before the 2016 U.S. presidential election is now attempting to steal coronavirus vaccine information from researchers in the U.S., U.K., and Canada. The governments of those three countries issued a warning on July 16 saying that the group known as APT29 or “Cozy Bear” is targeting vaccine development efforts. The group, which is connected with the FSB, Russia’s internal security service, had gotten inside the Democratic National Committee networks prior to the 2016 election. Read More

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Wired

Everything You Need to Know About the Oxford Covid-19 Vaccine 


The coronavirus pandemic has not exactly yielded much in the way of good news. But now a trial into an experimental Covid-19 vaccine is giving us one reason to be hopeful.

WIRED UK

This story originally appeared on WIRED UK.

Results from a team at the University of Oxford show that its vaccine—co-developed with the pharmaceutical firm AstraZeneca—is safe in humans and provokes an immune response. While this is a long way from being a fully working vaccine, it’s a promising, and vital, first step towards getting one. Read More

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TechCrunch

COVID-19 vaccine trials show promise – TechCrunch


Vaccine researchers have some good news, Google Maps adds end-to-end bikesharing directions and Roblox launches a new virtual event platform. Here’s your Daily Crunch for July 20, 2020.

The big story: COVID-19 vaccine trials show promise

Two vaccine trials — one conducted at the University of Oxford, and another by researchers in Wuhan — both had promising results, with a vaccine leading to an increased antibody response, while also appearing to be safe for human use.

The Oxford team is now ready to move on to phase three trials — these are the large-scale human trials that come before approval. However, my colleague Darrell Etherington warns against getting prematurely excited about these results: Read More

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The Next Web

Oxford’s COVID-19 vaccine is starting to look like a winner

Oxford researchers have developed a potential vaccine for COVID-19. Early testing in more than 1,000 clinical trial participants indicates the treatment is both safe and effective.

Epidemiology breakthroughs aren’t our usual subject matter here at TNW, but the opportunity to finally publish some actual good news about the COVID-19 pandemic was just too much for us to pass up.

The team, which included researchers from Oxford, and the Philipps University of  Marburg, Germany, developed the vaccine, called chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19), by genetically-engineering a different virus known to cause the common cold in chimpanzees. Read More

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TechCrunch

COVID-19 vaccine trials from the University of Oxford and Wuhan both show early positive results – TechCrunch


There are more promising signs from ongoing efforts to develop a vaccine that’s effective in preventing COVID-19: Two early trials, one from the University of Oxford, and one from a group of researchers in Wuhan funded in part by the National Key R&D Programme of China. Both early trials showed efficacy in increasing the presence of antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that leads to COVID-19, and also indicated that these prospective vaccines were safe to administer based on available information. Read More

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Tech Radar

“Russian hackers” target coronavirus vaccine research

Security services in the UK, US and Canada have warned that Russian hackers have begun to target organizations working on developing a coronavirus vaccine.

In a new advisory, the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) said that these hackers “almost certainly” were “part of Russian intelligence services” though it did not specify whether any information regarding a potential vaccine had been stolen or which organizations had been targeted.

In a statement to the Russia’s Tass news agency, Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov denied all responsibility for the recent hacks, saying: Read More

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TechCrunch

Russian cyberops are targeting COVID-19 vaccine R&D, intelligence agencies warn – TechCrunch


Western intelligence agencies say they’ve found evidence that Russian cyber espionage is targeting efforts to develop a coronavirus vaccine in a number of countries.

In an advisory report, the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) said the Russia-linked cyber espionage group commonly known as ‘APT29’ — which is also sometimes referred to as ‘the Dukes’ or ‘Cozy Bear’ — has targeted various organisations involved in medical R&D and COVID-19 vaccine development in Canada, the US and the UK throughout 2020. Read More

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Wired

Russia’s Latest Hacking Target: Covid-19 Vaccine Projects


The UK, US, and Canada have discovered hackers working on behalf of the Russian state launching attacks against coronavirus vaccine development projects.

WIRED UK

This story originally appeared on WIRED UK.

Criminals working for the hacking group Advanced Persistent Threat 29 (APT29), also known as Cozy Bear, have been caught attacking pharmaceutical businesses and academic institutions involved in vaccine development. Officials in the three countries believe these have been attempts to steal intellectual property and information about potential vaccine candidates. Read More