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Wired

The Garmin Hack Was a Warning


It’s been over a week since hackers crippled Garmin with a ransomware attack, and five days since its services started flickering back to life. The company still hasn’t fully recovered, as syncing issues and delays continue to haunt corners of the Garmin Connect platform. Two things, though, are clear: It could have been worse for Garmin. And it’s only a matter of time before ransomware’s big game hunters strike again.

By this point, the world has seen a few large-scale meltdowns stem from ransomware-style attacks, where hacker groups encrypt sensitive files and shake down the owners for money. In 2017, WannaCry swept the globe before intrepid hacker Marcus Hutchins found and activated its kill switch. That same year, NotPetya caused billions of dollars of damage at multinational corporations like Maersk and Merck, although the ransomware aspect turned out to be a front for a vicious data-wiper. Time appears to have emboldened some hackers, however, as large companies take their place on the list of popular targets, alongside hospitals and local governments. Read More

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Mashable

Trevor Noah has a warning for us about Trump’s new ‘somber’ coronavirus tone

If it seems like it might be too good to be true, that’s probably because it is.

After Trump’s press conference on Wednesday, the media widely reported on the “somber tone” he’d adopted regarding the coronavirus, which the president said was likely to “get worse before it gets better.”

Trevor Noah, however, isn’t convinced.

“It should be obvious to anyone with a memory better than a goldfish that this change of tone isn’t actually a sincere change of heart,” Noah says in the clip above. “Because, let’s just say, we’ve all been here before.” Read More

Categories
VentureBeat

Google-backed digital ad groups criticize Apple’s new user-tracking warning


(Reuters) — A group of European digital advertising associations on Friday criticized Apple’s plans to require apps to seek additional permission from users before tracking them across other apps and websites.

Apple last week disclosed features in its forthcoming operating system for iPhones and iPads that will require apps to show a pop-up screen before they enable a form of tracking commonly needed to show personalized ads.

Sixteen marketing associations, some of which are backed by Facebook and Alphabet’s Google, faulted Apple for not adhering to an ad-industry system for seeking user consent under European privacy rules. Apps will now need to ask for permission twice, increasing the risk users will refuse, the associations argued. Read More