Electric cars in Europe are three times cleaner than gasoline equivalents


YouTube Game Changer - Do you struggle to get views? Over 6,000 Video Marketers are using this tool to create eye-catching Thumbnails, why aren't you? Click here to learn more!


Another week, another study showing how much better electric vehicles are for the environment.

This time non-profit clean transport campaigners Transport and Environment suggest EVs are, on average, three times cleaner than comparable gasoline vehicles in Europe.

Transport and Environment compiled data about CO2 emissions from across the EU, including emissions data on: vehicles, battery production, and energy generation to show the amount of CO2 vehicles produce over their lifecycle.

The data also takes into consideration where the battery and EV was produced, where it’s charged, and where it’s driven.

[Read: What3words is about to make millions of car satnavs more accurate and easier to use]

For example, the study shows that driving an electric car — with a battery made in China — in Poland is still better for the environment than driving a diesel or petrol vehicle in the country, even though it relies heavily on coal to generate electricity. In this scenario an EV produces 22% less CO2 than a diesel and 28% less than a petrol vehicle.

However, an electric car with a Swedish made battery being driven in Sweden is significantly better for the environment than comparable gasoline vehicles — that’s thanks to its reliance on renewable energy sources. In this instance, an EV generates 80% less CO2 than a diesel, and 81% less than a petrol vehicle.

This situation is only expected to improve too. Transport and Environment expects electric cars to help Europe cut CO2 emissions four-fold by 2023 as the continent installs more renewable energy infrastructure, such as wind turbines and solar panels.

Transport and Environment has also put all this data in to a handy tool that lets you compare CO2 emissions produced by electric, diesel, and petrol cars across different European nations. Check it out below or visit this link to play around with the tool yourself.

Credit: Transport and Environment